While I was looking for an image for yesterday’s post on camp stoves, I came across this photo of WWII GI’s using a specially made “Pocket Stove” that was designed and manufactured for soldiers by Coleman. And I learned this interesting historical tidbit from the Coleman’s site:

“Less than twenty years later, World War II swept across the globe. Like many companies, The Coleman Company did its part to support the war effort. Allied munitions and air forces contained parts manufactured in Kansas by The Coleman Company. In June of 1942 the Army Quartermaster Corps issued an urgent request to the Coleman Company. Field troops were in dire need of a compact stove that could operate within a wide range of conditions in multiple theaters, weighed less than five pounds, could be no larger than a quart bottle of milk, and could burn any kind of fuel. And, the U.S. Army wanted 5,000 of the stoves delivered in sixty days.

Work commenced immediately to design and manufacture a stove that met the Army’s strict specifications. The end product far exceeded anything that the Army had requested: the stove could work at 60 degrees below and up to 150 degrees above Fahrenheit; it could burn all kinds of fuel; it weighed a mere three and one-half pounds; and it was smaller than a quart bottle of milk. The first order for 5,000 units was flown to U.S. forces involved in Operation Torch, an allied invasion of North Africa in 1942. World War II journalist Ernie Pyle devoted 15 news articles to the Coleman® pocket stove and considered it one of the two most important pieces of noncombat equipment in the war effort, the other being the Jeep.”

Via A Continuous Lean

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Huckberry is a deal site that features special sales each week exclusively to members, and the products available change each week. Every week, I pick out my favorite things from the week’s offerings.

Note: I usually do the Huckberry post at the start of the week’s sale, but we didn’t post last week, so this sale actually ends in one day.

We’re big fans of the pocket notebook here on AoM, and know many of our readers are too, so you might want to act quick and pick up some Made in America Field Notes for 20% off the regular price.

Oak Street is a paragon of bootmaking. All boots are constructed by Maine craftsmen with 20+ years of experience, and utilize Horween Chromexcel leather which undergoes 89 separate processes that take 28 days. Each pair also sports replaceable Vibram outsoles, a feature normally reserved for formal footwear, ensuring a lifetime of wear.

To browse the Huckberry Shop, you have to sign-up for the site. If you do, you get a $5 credit for being an AoM reader.  The reason that you must sign-up to browse and see the prices is that this is a members-only deal site, and the brands that offer their products for these special sales are only willing to offer those special prices to a small group and not to the public at large

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Flickr users have uploaded some amazing old photos of cowboys. Here are some of the standouts:

Source: deflam

Source: ettenw

Source: glenbowmuseum

Source: Newmexico51

Source: meagain625

Source: boytiger

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AoM reader James B. sent me this video of one his college professors talking about his new book, Theodore Roosevelt Abroad: Nature, Empire, and the Journey of an American President, which recounts TR’s travels after leaving the presidency. I quite enjoyed it, as it shows lots of photos and videos of TR which I had never seen before.

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Submit your best Chuck Norris Action Jeans Fact in the comments below.

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Via A Conversation on Cool

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Huckberry is a deal site that features special sales each week exclusively to members, and the products available change each week. Every week, I pick out my favorite things from the week’s offerings.

Moonshine: A Gentleman’s Cologne

If you follow AoM, you might remember that Moonshine cologne was created by our food writer, Matt Moore, along with two of his college friends. If you’ve been thinking about trying it, now’s a good time to do it; it’s on sale this week for almost $20 off in the Huckberry store.

Treadsmith Snowboards

Treadsmith is a different kind of snowboard company. It’s an independent, US-based company that’s run by two guys out of an Airstream trailer. They don’t do mass-production, slick advertising campaigns, event sponsorships, or celebrity endorsements. They don’t put their logo on their boards. What they do do is handcraft each incredibly light and fast board, hand paint each one with their classic, simple designs, and custom make each order.

Hudson Sutler Duffel Bags

Duffel bags are great for going to the gym or quick trips to see a friend. They’re even better when every single part is Made in America.

 

To browse the Huckberry Shop, you have to sign-up for the site. If you do, you get a $5 credit for being an AoM reader.  The reason that you must sign-up to browse and see the prices is that this is a members-only deal site, and the brands that offer their products for these special sales are only willing to offer those special prices to a small group and not to the public at large.

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From Jan. 1933 issue of MODERN MECHANIX magazine

Source: MODERN MECHANIX

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Huckberry is a deal site that features special sales each week exclusively to members, and the products available change each week. Every week, I pick out my favorite things from the week’s offerings.

Luke Lamp Co.

This week I’m digging the cool lamps made by  the Luke Lamp Company. 23-year old Luke Kelly makes the vintage, industrial-looking, Edison-esque lamps in his home in Manaroneck, NY.

To browse the Huckberry Shop, you have to sign-up for the site. If you do, you get a $5 credit for being an AoM reader.  The reason that you must sign-up to browse and see the prices is that this is a members-only deal site, and the brands that offer their products for these special sales are only willing to offer those special prices to a small group and not to the public at large.

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Hat tip to Robby B.

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