Norman Mailer’s Nautical Apartment

Norman Mailer, author of manly books like The Naked and the Dead, died in 2007 and now his Manhattan apartment is up for sale. A passionate sailor, Mailer created his unique, multilevel pad with a nautical feel, complete with ladders, galley-like floors, narrow parapets high above the living room and a gangplank that had to be crossed to get to Mailer’s writing “crow’s nest.” This “jungle gym at sea” was filled with Mailer’s interesting knickknacks. At one time the apartment also had a “hammock strung up between the rafters, a trapeze swing dangling from the ceiling and a rope ladder.” Sounds like a pretty fun place to live. And for $2.5 million the apartment can be yours, Mailer’s possessions included.

Read the Whole Article: Norman Mailer’s Last Home Still Reflects His Life (@NYT)

Check out the photo slideshow of Norman Mailer’s apartment.

Note: I’ve gotten pretty good at anticipating comments, so let’s say right at the outset, that yes, Norman Mailer was married six times and wasn’t always the best dad. You can admire a man’s apartment and his work without having to model every aspect of your life on him. Sigh.

{ 4 comments… read them below or add one }

Wilson Hines May 3, 2011 at 5:37 pm

In regards to your footnote, I just finished American Lit II Honors class where I did extensive study on Hemingway. I must say I don’t know of a single writer worth his salt that wasn’t either a psychopath or a bad parent/father. It seems like it goes with the territory.

Danny Z May 3, 2011 at 5:49 pm

That photo is beyond epic. I’m in NYC but sadly, I only have 80 cents in my bank account. I hate college…

Lee Nelson May 4, 2011 at 2:35 pm

Wasn’t the best dad?

The guy was a class-a bastard. He nearly killed his second wife with a penknife, saying “Let the bitch die.” He punched one in the stomach while she was pregnant. The last wife he raped. Not in any way a man to be emulated.

Peter K May 4, 2011 at 10:10 pm

I actually work in real estate in Brooklyn. Sadly they can’t find a buyer for it, even though his kids are essentially including all his memorabilia in with the deal.

Kind of a drag since he was not only a great writer but an outstanding cultural icon from the 40s well into the 80s. Most people considered his views passez and I’ve even seen attempts to destroy him posthumously. Most of his books are out of print, but his legacy has been somewhat revived by a recent documentary.

To Lee: No, he’s not someone you want to emulate. But you can’t help but admire him. He accomplished things that most only dream of. How right you are, he was a bastard, but a talented one at that.

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